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Here Are 21 Pics Of Beyond Perfect Concrete Work To Satisfy Any Perfectionist

It could be a bit odd to admit sometimes but most of us find various things really satisfying. And luckily, the Internet is this happy place where you can find anything and everything, regardless of what your idea of perfection is. Whether it’s neatly planted trees casting shadows in a picturesque manner, 10 same-looking cute little doggos, a row of cups placed on the kitchen counter with amazing precision – you name it and the Internet will provide. But this time, it was a man working for a concrete company who decided to please the eyes of all the perfectionists of the online world. Scroll down to check out their work!

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Concrete is the material to thank for most of our architecture miracles. It can be used in amounts that are both impressive and a tiny bit frightening. For example, the world’s record for the largest concrete pour in a single project belongs to the Three Gorges Dam in Hubei Province, China and it required 16 million cubic meters of concrete over 17 years of construction.

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Concrete is sometimes also called Portland cement concrete for its visual resemblance to Portland stone and is made of coarse and fluid ingredients in order to harden not instantly but over time. This allows for it to be worked into the most precise designs.

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This is one of the most frequently used building materials and was first used as long ago as 700 BC. Ancient Nabataeans used concrete-like materials for house construction, flooring and to make underground water containers. Some of these structures can be still found today.

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There is also concrete work found in Greece which dates back to 1400-1200 BC. At that time, people discovered they could add volcanic ash to it to improve the mix and allow it to set underwater.

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It was also extensively used by the Romans and it’s one of the reasons why so many of their structures survived to this day.

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See Also on Bored Panda

See Also on Bored Panda
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Read more: http://www.boredpanda.com/satisfying-concrete-work/

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This Is How 6 Castles Across The UK Looked Before Falling Into Disrepair

There is something wonderful about visiting castles.

As you walk through the ruins, your imagination begins to fill in the blanks about the people who lived there, the history of the place and the architectural details that have been lost. But what if you didn’t need to use your imagination? Luckily, the digital age has given us the tools to recreate the complete picture by rebuilding these incredible castles without any heavy lifting. And that’s what On Stride Financial has done with these mind-blowing reconstructions.

With the help of an architect (and a dose of technology), they’ve brought back to life 6 spectacular castles across the United Kingdom – from Bothwell Castle in Scotland to Kidwelly Castle in Wales.

So jump on a journey back in time to see what has been relentlessly destroyed by time, and by people.

1. Dunluce Castle (County Antrim, Northern Ireland)

Image credits: onstride

Image credits: onstride

Dunluce has one of the most dramatic histories of any UK castle. Built around 1500, it was abandoned as early as 1639. The castle’s kitchen – and kitchen staff – had collapsed over the cliff edge and into the sea as the 2nd Earl of Antrim’s family sat waiting for their dinner.

Two years later, the small town that developed around the castle was razed by the Scots and abandoned. It has now become a valuable archaeological site and the historic footprint of this short-lived settlement is a haunting destination for visitors to the northern tip of Northern Ireland.

Image credits: onstride

2. Dunstanburgh Castle (Northumberland, England)

Image credits: onstride

Image credits: onstride

King Edward II’s most powerful baron, Earl Thomas of Lancaster, built this enormous castle as a show of might when relations soured between the two men. However, the earl was captured and executed before he could enjoy his epic crib.

The castle fell into disrepair after sustaining damage as a battle hotspot during the Wars of the Roses. Today, a walk along the Northumberland Coast in view of Dunstanburgh’s ruins offers a melancholy but awe-inspiring day out.

Image credits: onstride

3. Bothwell Castle (South Lanarkshire, Scotland)

Image credits: onstride

Image credits: onstride

This thirteenth-century castle saw a lot of action through Scotland’s Wars of Independence. It repeatedly swapped hands between the Scots and the English in the wake of fierce battles.

Architecturally, Bothwell is notable for its “cylindrical donjon” (a fortified refuge for the castle’s inhabitants), which was ruined in a series of sieges. Visit on Halloween and you may encounter the ghost of Bonnie Jean, a noblewoman who drowned crossing the River Clyde to elope with her lover.

Image credits: onstride

4. Goodrich Castle (Herefordshire, England)

Image credits: onstride

Image credits: onstride

Goodrich was begun in 1102, and strengthened later that century by the fantastically named Godric Mappestone (from whom the castle probably took its name). It wasn’t until the Civil Wars of 1642-6 that the stronghold would sustain serious damage. Cromwell’s army pelted it with 200-pound balls from Roaring Meg, a cannon built specifically for the purpose.

After the war, the ruined castle was partially dismantled and then abandoned. Thankfully, they’ve since installed a tearoom so visitors can recharge after enjoying the historical exhibits and spectacular views from the parapets.

Image credits: onstride

5. Caerlaverock Castle (Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland)

Image credits: onstride

Image credits: onstride

The UK’s only triangular castle has a triple history: built in the 1280s, it was partially dismantled in the 14th century on the word of Sir Robert Bruce, to prevent it falling into English hands. Once rebuilt, it was again taken apart after being besieged by the Earl of Sussex in 1570. Again rebuilt, a thirteen-week siege during the Bishops War resulted in one last dismantlement; and that is how the castle is to be found today.

But the ruins are awesome. Caerlaverock’s moat, twin-towered gatehouse and lofty battlements are supplemented by an exhibition honouring the castle’s turbulent history.

Image credits: onstride

6. Kidwelly Castle (Dyfed, Wales)

Image credits: onstride

Image credits: onstride

Kidwelly was initially built as a wooden structure as the Normans entered southwest Wales, around 1106. Major stone fortification was added in the final decade of the 1300s, just in time to withstand a five-month siege at the outbreak of the Owain Glyn Dwr rebellion.

The following years of peace diverted the focus to residential building and the grandeur of Kidwelly’s military fortress was allowed to fade. This means that although it’s considered a ruin, Kidwelly is actually one of the best preserved and most awe-inspiring castles in Wales today. Catch a view of it in the morning mist to truly feel you’ve been transported through time.

Image credits: onstride

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Read more: http://www.boredpanda.com/ruined-castles-uk-digital-reconstructions-onstride/

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Architect Turns Old Cement Factory Into His Home, And The Interior Will Take Your Breath Away

When Ricardo Bofill stumbled upon a dilapidated cement factory in 1973, he immediately saw a world of possibilities. La fábrica was born, and almost 45 years later, the structure has been completely transformed into a spectacular and unique home.

The factory, located just outside of Barcelona, was a WWI-era pollution machine that had closed down, and came with many repairs to be done when Ricardo Bofill and his team purchased it. After years of partial deconstruction, the determined architect proceeded to lace the exterior of the property with vegetation, and furnish the interior as a modern living and work space.

La fábrica is a work in progress to this day, to which Bofill likens his own life, as his visions for the future continue to change shape. The industrial chimneys that once filled the air with smoke now overflow with lush greenery, a fine example of the beautiful transformations that result from creative thinking.

In 1973, Spanish architect Ricardo Bofill purchased a WWI-era cement factory near Barcelona

He immediately saw potential in the building, and began renovating it into his home

After years of partial deconstruction, his team proceeded to furnish the interior as a modern living space

The exterior was laced with vegetation, and now overflows with lush greenery

The structure has been completely transformed into a spectacular and unique home

“The Cement Factory is a place of work par excellence” Bofill writes on his official website

Each room is designed with its own special purpose, and no 2 look quite alike

“I have the impression of living… in a closed universe which protects me from the outside and everyday life” Bofill writes

“Life goes on here in a continuous sequence, with very little difference between work and leisure”

A variety of indoor and outdoor relaxation spots can be found throughout the property

Work space is also a crucial component here, as Bofill’s team uses part of the residence as a studio

The exterior is mostly covered by grass, but also eucalyptus, palm, and olive trees

This gives the building a “mysterious aspect of romantic ruin that makes it unique and unrepeatable”

“The kitchen-dining room located in the ground floor is the meeting point for the family”

Despite its incredible transformation, the factory is still a work in progress to this day

Bufill likens the project’s constant evolution to his own lifestyle and creative visions

La fábrica will always have further work to be done, which is part of its symbolic charm

With enough creative thinking, any space can become something new and beautiful

Read more: http://www.boredpanda.com/cement-factory-renovation-la-fabrica-ricardo-bofill/

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