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How to Cook Like Legendary Chef Jacques Ppin

I love that your latest cookbook, A Grandfathers Lessons, was inspired by your 13-year-old granddaughter, Shorey. We were not even supposed to do a book! Shorey and I started working together on [2015 TV series] Heart & Soul. It was a lot of fun to work together, so we decided to do a series of videos, and my daughter said, You have to do a book! Thirty-six of the 75 recipes we taped in a video. We even did videos on table manners, how to fold napkins. The book covers everything from arctic char with fresh tomato to a hot dog cut so that it curls up when you cook it.

How long have you been cooking with Shorey? I started when she was a year and a half old. I put a spoon in her hand when I was holding her and helped her stir the pot. Since she was 4 or 5 years old, when she came to the house, shed get involved. When she was small, shed help hand me ingredients or stir the soup or wash vegetables. Its also a question for someone at my age, over 80 years old: How do you communicate with a teenager? Im much faster in the kitchen than her, but shes much faster with her iPhone and her computer than I am. When we cook together, we spend time together around the table, talking. Its a learning experience, too: Theres lots of science, math, geography in cooking.

Did you enjoy making the shorter videos for A Grandfathers Lessons? We did [the filming] in my back house here in Connecticut, and we did it in the summer when Shorey was out of school. It was a less lavish production than we do usually on PBS. We worked with Tom Hopkins, the photographer who shot the photos for the book, whos worked with me for 35 years. He was the producer as well. It was a lot of fun.

As the co-founder of Boston Universitys gastronomy program and a longtime dean at the International Culinary Center in New York, youve literally made a career out of teaching people to cook; was teaching your own granddaughter different? When Im giving a class for professionals, its different than when I give a class for home cooks. You try to massage the lessons a little bit for the person youre teaching. With my granddaughter, its rewarding, because shes my granddaughter! The memories of the kitchenof your mother, your father, the smells, the tastesthey stay with you for the rest of your life.

What are your favorite tips for teaching kids to cook (and eat)? I think that there is not really one way of doing it. Certainly getting them exposed to cooking is important. People come to my house and they know were going to have some nice food, but they feed their kids something else beforehand: I dont think thats a good idea. Whats on the table is whats on the table in our house, and we dont discuss it. We never bought baby food; we took some of the food we ate and put it in the food processor. By the time my daughter was 8 or 9 years old and eating spaghetti and clam sauce, she already recognized the taste from even earlier.

You also have another book out this month called My Menus featuring illustrated menus like the ones you create for your own dinner parties. Why are handwritten menus so important? Ive been married 51 years, and I have 12 large books of menus. I can see what we ate 50 years ago, and I can also see my mother, my two brothers who are gone, and those are great memories. I can see what my daughter had for dinner for her 15th birthday! In the book, you can fill in the menus with what you served, and your guests can sign the opposite page. Its a great way of remembering.

Youve been an artist for almost as long as youve been a chef, with an online gallery of your paintings for sale. How did you get started painting? I first came to America in 1959, and I think the next summer we rented a house with a friend in Woodstock, New York. I liked working with my hands, and wed refinish and redo old furniture wed find on the street. In Woodstock, there were a lot of artistspeople painting and so forthand we started painting. And then when I went to Columbia University [in the early 1960s], I took a class in drawing and sculpture, so Ive been doing art a long time. I actually just finished a new painting half an hour ago!

Your first cookbook came out in 1975; whats changed the most in the food world since then, and whats changed the least? Good food is still good food. That will never change. But the diversity has changed a lot. When I came to America, there was only one lettuce in the supermarket, and it was iceberg. There were no shallots, no kale. The supermarket is better today than its ever been. I read somewhere that there are more than 5,000 farmers markets in America today. People say nobody cooks now, but all the food from those farmers markets has to be going somewhere. Back in the 70s, all the best continental restaurants in the U.S. were French. You couldnt even get good Italian food in New York! Now, there are 24,000 restaurants in New York with food from all over the world.

What does your home kitchen look like? I have a very, very large counter6 by 9 feet. I have two dishwashers. Functionality is the word for me. In professional kitchens in Paris, youd think the chef is blindhe can grab things, open the oven, all without looking. Its like a dance. A kitchen setup like that can really make things easy. Good equipment, easily accessible, is really important. I have a wall made of barn wood with probably 80 different pots and pans hanging from it. It looks nice, and its also useful.

What do you cook when youre cooking for fun? I always cook for fun, frankly! Weve had so much zucchini in the garden that lately Ive been making zucchini bread, zucchini soup. Thats really how I cook. Its determined by the market and the garden. Whats in season and what were in the mood for. Our taste has also changed; I dont cook the same things now that I did 50 years ago.

Do you watch any food TV shows today? Not really. I do occasionally watch Rick Bayless or somebody on PBS. I watch Anthony Bourdain on CNN because hes a good friend, but honestly, I dont watch too much food TV. So many of them are reality shows with a lot of yelling that I dont like so much anyway.

In the late 1950s, before you ever came to America, you served as personal chef to three French heads of state, including Charles de Gaulle; what was that like? It was another world. It was another world of cooking; how many people there were in the kitchen. At a state dinner, you have to deal with protocols, how long the dinner is supposed to be, and all kinds of other little rules. Its also different when you just cook for the president. Every Sunday after church, I would make a meal for the president and his whole familychildren, grandchildren, everybody.

If you could cook dinner with anybody, living or dead, who would it be, and what would you cook? It would always be with family. For me, I would bring back my father or my mother and cook with them again. I know what they like and what they will be pleased with. I did enjoy cooking with Michelle Obama one time out of the organic garden at the White House, but I would probably go back to people I love who were close to me.

Jacques Ppins new books, A Grandfathers Lessons and My Menus, are both available now. The companion videos for A Grandfathers Lessons are available for free here.

Interview has been condensed and edited.

Read more: https://www.thedailybeast.com/how-to-cook-like-legendary-chef-jacques-pepin

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More Thanksgiving fun: Slate explains why turkey day is a sexist 1950s nightmare

What is it about Thanksgiving and liberals anyway — well, aside from those who’d do away with the holiday altogether and throw it on the scrapheap with Columbus Day. Having the family over for dinner calls for a social justice support hotline for liberal talking points. The New York Times jokes about mixing Xanax into the stuffing. Is Thanksgiving really so bad?

Enter Slate with the answer: Thanksgiving turns your marriage into a sexist 1950s nightmare.

Read more: https://twitchy.com/brettt-3136/2017/11/20/more-thanksgiving-fun-slate-explains-why-turkey-day-is-a-sexist-1950s-nightmare/

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Eric Trump’s defense of his father’s ‘Pocahontas’ slur is baffling

Eric Trump, son of President Donald Trump, is being torn to shreds on Twitter for an ignorant (maybe willfully ignorant) defense of his father’s use of “Pocahontas” as a derogatory term for Senator Elizabeth Warren. His argument? Disney did it first. Seriously.

Donald Trump first used the insult during his 2016 campaign to attack Warren for claiming Native American ancestry, but this time he trotted it out at a White House event honoring Navajo code talkers.

“We have a representative in Congress who they say was here a long time ago. They call her ‘Pocahontas,’” Trump quipped.

Native Americans understandably took offense to the use of “Pocahontas” as an insult. Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye, told CNN he thought it rose to the level of a racial slur.

“Pocahontas is a real person. It’s not a caricature, it’s not someone that’s just made up. This is a person, a young lady, a Native American woman that played a critical role in the life of this nation, and to use that person in that way is unnecessary and it’s being culturally insensitive,” he said.

Eric Trump’s bad tweet assumes that people are arguing the name “Pocahontas,” not the demeaning context in which his father used it, is offensive. And if that’s true, isn’t Disney just as culpable?

It’s not true, though. Although there are plenty of things to criticize about Disney’s portrayal of Pocahontas, the company didn’t use her name as a pejorative. “Pocahontas” wasn’t even a nasty nickname for Warren until Donald Trump made it one. The “irony” Eric perceives here simply doesn’t exist, and he seems to be grasping at straws to extend the narrative that the President is an innocent victim of the mainstream media.

Is Eric Trump ignorant, just tweeting in bad faith, or both? Doesn’t really matter, because he’s getting “ratio’d”—Twitter slang for a tweet with a high ratio of angry comments to retweets and likes—either way. A few hours after posting, he’s got 11,000 comments, and most of them are negative.

R.I.P. Eric Trump’s Twitter mentions.

Read more: https://www.dailydot.com/unclick/eric-trump-bad-pocahontas-tweet/

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12 Tidy and Perfect Gifts for the Neat Freak in Your Life

All of these things are perfectly beautiful. All of these things have designs that exhibit an understated elegance. All of these things will help your loved one keep everything tidy, organized, and just so. All of these things are items they can display proudly on their office desk or in their home. All of these things are things you should get for the neat freak in your life, even if that neat freak is you. By the way, has anyone ever told you that you have excellent taste?

Japanese Ceramic Mugs

Coffee is never to be sipped out of a mug with an ironic slogan or a gaudy logo. They know this, so get them a vessel that fully honors the delicately crafted beverage within. These Hasami ceramic mugs are made in Nagasaki, Japan out of a mixture of porcelain and clay. They stack for orderly storage, too. Aren’t they truly beautiful? Buy for $56.

Credit: TRNK NYC

Coffee is never to be sipped out of a mug with an ironic slogan or a gaudy logo. They know this, so get them a vessel that fully honors the delicately crafted beverage within. These Hasami ceramic mugs are made in Nagasaki, Japan out of a mixture of porcelain and clay. They stack for orderly storage, too. Aren’t they truly beautiful? Buy for $56.

Bluelounge CableDrop Multi

Wireless charging is a gift from heaven, but it’s not that practical yet. So things still need to be plugged in with cords, which generate unsightly clutter. Tame the fray with this genius device from BlueLounge. They can stick it out of sight—on the back of the dresser, under the desk—and never be bothered by the sight of a cable just, like, sitting there. Out in the open! Buy for $9.

Credit: Blue Lounge

Wireless charging is a gift from heaven, but it’s not that practical yet. So things still need to be plugged in with cords, which generate unsightly clutter. Tame the fray with this genius device from BlueLounge. They can stick it out of sight—on the back of the dresser, under the desk—and never be bothered by the sight of a cable just, like, sitting there. Out in the open! Buy for $9.

Ideaco Granroof Slim Tissue Case

One thing neat freaks always have on hand: tissues. This gorgeous case conceals the godawful cardboard box most tissues show up in. It’s understated and discreet, just like every one of their sneezes. Buy for $39.

Credit: Ideaco

One thing neat freaks always have on hand: tissues. This gorgeous case conceals the godawful cardboard box most tissues show up in. It’s understated and discreet, just like every one of their sneezes. Buy for $39.

Normann Copenhagen Flow Table Lamp

The best lamps are also sculptures—just look at your loved one’s dwelling spaces, and see how many museum-worthy lighting pieces you can spot. The Flow lamp is Zen-like in its purity. The thin structural elements articulate in three places, so they can position the LED in the head to properly light whatever beautiful object they’re inspecting. Even if it’s just a spreadsheet. Buy for $370.

Credit: Joseph Shin/WIRED

The best lamps are also sculptures—just look at your loved one’s dwelling spaces, and see how many museum-worthy lighting pieces you can spot. The Flow lamp is Zen-like in its purity. The thin structural elements articulate in three places, so they can position the LED in the head to properly light whatever beautiful object they’re inspecting. Even if it’s just a spreadsheet. Buy for $370.

Bluelounge Quick Peek

Your loved one is proud of their tidy storage system. The Quick Peek will help them organize it more intelligently. Take some photos of the contents of the storage box, then put one of these stickers on the box. Inside the companion app, scan the sticker and add the photos of what’s in the box. Then, a year or two down the road, there’s no need to open the box to be reminded of what’s inside. Just scan the sticker again; the contents will show up on the phone. Buy for $10.

Credit: Blue Lounge

Your loved one is proud of their tidy storage system. The Quick Peek will help them organize it more intelligently. Take some photos of the contents of the storage box, then put one of these stickers on the box. Inside the companion app, scan the sticker and add the photos of what’s in the box. Then, a year or two down the road, there’s no need to open the box to be reminded of what’s inside. Just scan the sticker again; the contents will show up on the phone. Buy for $10.

Poppin White Super Stacked

You don’t expect them to keep their writing utensils in the cheap company-issued pen cup, do you? Poppin’s desktop organization collection is smart, inexpensive, and has more clean lines than a Sol LeWitt. They get two letter trays, an accessory tray, and a (gorgeous!) pen cup. The set also comes with 12 matching pens and a silicone “This + That” tray for paperclips, change, or whatever. Buy for $55.

Credit: Poppin

You don’t expect them to keep their writing utensils in the cheap company-issued pen cup, do you? Poppin’s desktop organization collection is smart, inexpensive, and has more clean lines than a Sol LeWitt. They get two letter trays, an accessory tray, and a (gorgeous!) pen cup. The set also comes with 12 matching pens and a silicone “This + That” tray for paperclips, change, or whatever. Buy for $55.

Kikkerland Bedside Caddy

Yes, the Kindle and magazines on their bedside table are neatly stacked. But you know they’d rather have them out of sight. This felt caddy does the trick. It slots between the mattress and box spring (or between the mattress and bed frame) where it functions like a little pocket. Buy for $18.

Credit: Kikkerland

Yes, the Kindle and magazines on their bedside table are neatly stacked. But you know they’d rather have them out of sight. This felt caddy does the trick. It slots between the mattress and box spring (or between the mattress and bed frame) where it functions like a little pocket. Buy for $18.

Turms Complete Shoe Care Kit With Wood Case

There are two ways to get perfectly shiny, scuff-free leather shoes. One is to watch for the first signs of wear, then immediately replace the shoes with a fresh pair. The other is to carefully clean and polish the shoes regularly. This shoe care kit will give your loved one all the tools and supplies they need, including a wide selection of brushes with different stiffnesses, four tins of polish, and even a lovely shoe horn. Of course, it all packs away into a handsome box. Buy for $975.

Credit: Mr Porter

There are two ways to get perfectly shiny, scuff-free leather shoes. One is to watch for the first signs of wear, then immediately replace the shoes with a fresh pair. The other is to carefully clean and polish the shoes regularly. This shoe care kit will give your loved one all the tools and supplies they need, including a wide selection of brushes with different stiffnesses, four tins of polish, and even a lovely shoe horn. Of course, it all packs away into a handsome box. Buy for $975.

Inkaren Memo Clips

These chipboard paper clips are much more refined than the pedestrian metal ones. Plus, since you can jot notes right on them, it’s a great way for your loved one to annotate their readings without leaving even a single pen mark in the margins. Buy for $6.

Credit: Joseph Shin/WIRED

These chipboard paper clips are much more refined than the pedestrian metal ones. Plus, since you can jot notes right on them, it’s a great way for your loved one to annotate their readings without leaving even a single pen mark in the margins. Buy for $6.

DocX Magazine Rack

You know they love their periodicals. And like any true fan of modern architecture, they love raw concrete. This magazine rack melds the two obsessions. Plus, the 14-pound sculpture is whimsically shaped like a computer folder icon. A digital symbol to cradle their analog passions. Pick it up from the retailer Industry West, which has a bunch of smartly designed items for your home. Buy for $159.

Credit: Joseph Shin/WIRED

You know they love their periodicals. And like any true fan of modern architecture, they love raw concrete. This magazine rack melds the two obsessions. Plus, the 14-pound sculpture is whimsically shaped like a computer folder icon. A digital symbol to cradle their analog passions. Pick it up from the retailer Industry West, which has a bunch of smartly designed items for your home. Buy for $159.

Ikea Gessan Box

These are made for use in the bathroom, where they’re meant to hold toothbrushes and toothpaste. But they work absolutely anywhere some easy, attractive storage is needed. Buy a bunch of them and your loved one can use them to hold hair clips, pens, flowers, business cards, straws, snacks. Buy for $3.

Credit: Ikea

These are made for use in the bathroom, where they’re meant to hold toothbrushes and toothpaste. But they work absolutely anywhere some easy, attractive storage is needed. Buy a bunch of them and your loved one can use them to hold hair clips, pens, flowers, business cards, straws, snacks. Buy for $3.

Oxo Good Grips Compact Dustpan & Brush Set

With an angled handle that makes it more comfortable to sweep waist-high surfaces, this dustpan and brush set is ideal for use on the kitchen counter, the coffee station, the desktop, the dining room table, or on the bar. The brush snaps into the dustpan, making it even easier to store. Buy for $7.

Credit: Oxo Good Grips

With an angled handle that makes it more comfortable to sweep waist-high surfaces, this dustpan and brush set is ideal for use on the kitchen counter, the coffee station, the desktop, the dining room table, or on the bar. The brush snaps into the dustpan, making it even easier to store. Buy for $7.

When you buy something using the retail links in our buying guides, we may earn a small affiliate commission. Read more about how this works.

When you buy something using the retail links in our buying guides, we may earn a small affiliate commission. Read more about how this works.

Read more: https://www.wired.com/2017/11/gifts-for-the-neat-freak/

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Thanksgiving 2017: Here’s How Celebs Spent Turkey Day!

Food, family, and philanthropy!!

Like many of us, our favorite celebs spent Turkey Day consuming copious amounts of food and kicking it with relatives. We mean, Sofia Vergara had a pretty festive celebration with her loved ones. They had turkey hats and everything!!

However, Aaron Carter spent his Thanksgiving giving back to those less fortunate. Yup, the former child star – who has had a rough year himself — worked the kitchen at Project Angel Food. Color us impressed!

Still, we can’t help but be floored by the LAVISH AF Thanksgiving that Kylie Jenner threw for her family. Unsurprisingly, Kylie documented the whole thing on Snapchat. Although, Khloé Kardashian was MIA from the celebration as she spent the holiday with Tristan Thompson.

For all of that and more be sure to…

CLICK HERE to view “Here’s How Celebs Spent Thanksgiving!”

CLICK HERE to view “Here’s How Celebs Spent Thanksgiving!”

CLICK HERE to view “Here’s How Celebs Spent Thanksgiving!”

CLICK HERE to view “Here’s How Celebs Spent Thanksgiving!”

CLICK HERE to view “Here’s How Celebs Spent Thanksgiving!”

[Image via Instagram/Snapchat.]

Read more: http://perezhilton.com/2017-11-24-thanksgiving-celebrity-celebrations-kardashian-jenner-aaron-carter-photos

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Marvels The Punisher Offers a Damning Critique of Americas Gun Fetish

Is Marvels The Punisher, featuring Frank Castlea gun-toting, revenge-happy antiheroa necessary series right now as gun debates rage on and mass shootings increase in America? Turns out it just might be, but not without some much-needed rewriting of Franks history.

In the comics, Castle is a near-deranged war vet who mows down criminals like Paul Kersey in Death Wish, only with an Army-grade arsenal. The Punisher smartly places Frank at the center of a government conspiracy: his unit was unwittingly forced into committing war crimes, and now he wants to kill everyone responsible.

The Punisher is an extremely violent seriesmuch like Marvels other Netflix series. There have been meditations on whether or not the violence is justified from series to series: Daredevil and Jessica Jones are pretty nonchalant about it, Luke Cage uses it with reservation, and Iron Fist has its titular character dead set against killing people until he joins the others in The Defenders. This show, however, treats violence much more viscerally. You see blood splattering from gunshots; you see an arrow being pulled from a wound. The violence is abundant and the gore quotient tops any previous Marvel series.

It comes as no surprise that showrunner Steve Lightfoot previously worked on Hannibal, because the violence is slow and methodical. It focuses on brutality in a way that sticks with you; that makes you feel like youre actually experiencing it not simply because its cool, but because The Punisher is very invested in how violence affects us as humans.

Frank is plagued by PTSD from his tours in Afghanistan and Iraq, and frequently has dreams about his murdered family. Jon Bernthal is great at conveying the emotions of a man on the verge of a nervous breakdown, and much the same way Hannibal focused on the mind of Will Graham and how violence changes him, The Punisher focuses on how Franks worldview is perverted by the actions of a government that was entrusted to protect him.

Further making the series an indictment of the U.S. government are the scenes with a veteran support group. It illustrates how our country treats the men and women of our military once they come home and have to return to normal lives. We see attempts to protest the government, mental triggers that leave one soldier digging a foxhole in his yard, and the effect of one soldier being manipulated by a man who resembles the hate-mongering Make America Great Again crowd.

Since the series is chock-full of guns, it may seem as though it must support the Second Amendment crowd and the right to bear arms. But, even though Frank uses guns to exact his revenge, the show is decidedly anti-gun, depicting how these deadly weapons cripple us emotionally, and also physically.

Mostly, the series feels far more grounded than previous Netflix series, even with its pulpy revenge and conspiracy-theory elements. The series before it have attempted to be grounded, but they also strike an odd balance in mixing superheroes with a gritty, realistic setting that often pretends like aliens dont regularly land on Earth and have knock-down, drag-out fights with other aliens.

The Punisher mostly does away with this as it strips superheroism from its premise, along with the requisite winks and nods at other Marvel series. Aside from a couple of cameos and the appearance of Karen Page as a supporting character, The Punisher truly feels like a stand-alone series in a way that none of the other Marvel Netflix series have accomplished.

Its slow-building but moves with a purpose, whereas many of Marvels other Netflix series drag toward the finish line. The Punisher manages to focus primarily on the struggles of men and women who are damaged in ways that are fresh for television. Theres Frank and his computer hacker-friend Micro, both dealing with faking their own deaths (though Micro actually has a family hes abandoned), but theres also Dinah Madani, who is perhaps one of televisions most interesting characters.

The show feels a bit like Homeland with its dizzying conspiracies but its also the anti-Homeland. Amber Rose Revah portrays a Persian-American woman working for Homeland Security whos great at her job, despite being distrusted by colleagues. Its a three-dimensional character replete with a mother she can have tough conversations with, a sex life, and a ferocious personality at work. It shows that The Punisher is about more than adapting comic book charactersits about fleshing out humans.

Read more: https://www.thedailybeast.com/marvels-the-punisher-offers-a-damning-critique-of-americas-gun-fetish

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How to Lock Down Your Facebook Privacy Settings

Facebook deserves a lot of the flack it gets, be it for providing Russian propaganda with a platform or gradually eroding privacy norms. Still, it has some genuine usefulness. And while the single best way to keep your privacy safe on Facebook is to delete your account, taking these simple steps in the settings is the next best thing.

Remember, it's not just friends of friends you need to think about hiding from; it's an army of advertisers looking to target you not just on Facebook itself, but around the web, using Facebook's ad platform. In the video above and the post below, we'll show you how to deal with both.

Fine-Tuning Friends

Limiting who can see which of your posts is an easy first step. On a desktop, go to the little dropdown arrow in the upper-right corner, and click Settings. From there, click on Privacy on the left-hand side. This is where the magic happens.

Under Who can see my stuff, click on Who can see your future posts to manage your defaults. You can make public to anyone at all, limited to your friends, or exclude specific friends. You can quarantine your posts by geography, or by current or previous employers or schools, or by groups. Just remember that the next time you change it, the new group becomes the default. So double check every time you post.

This section has other important privacy tools you can fiddle with, including who can look you up with your email address or phone number. We'd recommend not listing either in the first place, but if you do, keep the circle as small as possible. (If you do have to share one or the other with Facebook for account purposes, you can hide them by going to your profile page, clicking Contact and Basic Info, then Edit when you mouse over the email field. From there, click on the downward arrow with two silhouettes to customize who can see it, including no one but you.)

But pay special attention to the option to (deep breath) Limit the audience for posts you’ve shared with friends of friends or public? If you ever had a public account, taking it private wasn't retroactive. If you want to hide those previously viewable posts, lock this setting down.

Over on Timeline and Tagging you can control over what shows up on your own Facebook timeline. Basically, you can’t stop your friends from tagging you (sorry!), but you can stop those embarrassing photos from popping up on your page. At the very least, you should go to Review posts you’re tagged in before the post appears on your timeline, and enable that so that you can screen any tags before they land on your page.

To test out your changes, go to Review what other people see on your timeline. You can even see how specific people view your page, like your boss or your ex or complete strangers. It also never hurts to take stock of you present yourself to the world. (Looking at you, people who haven't updated your cover photo since the Obama administration.)

That should about cover your friends. Now onto advertisers, which are like friends, except they never leave you alone, even if you ask nicely.

Ad It Up

In that same Settings panel, head down to Ads. As you probably realized, Facebook knows what you do pretty much everywhere online. So does Google, so do dozens of ad networks you’ve never heard of. You're being tracked pretty much all the time, by everyone, thanks to this here internet.

You can still limit how Facebook uses that information, though. Tired of that lawnmower you looked at following you to Facebook? Turn off Ads based on my use of websites and apps. Saying no to Ads on apps and websites off the Facebook companies does the same, except for all the sites Facebook serves ads to around the web. Which is most of them.

Lastly, for some fun insight into how advertisers think of you, click on Your Interests. There you’ll find all the categories Facebook uses to tailor ads for you. You can remove any you don’t like, and marvel at the ones that don’t make any sense. This won't make the ads go away, but it'll at least you can banish all those off-brand kitchen gadgets from your News Feed.

And you’re good! Or at least, as good as can be expected. It’s still Facebook, after all.


Facebook Privacy

Read more: https://www.wired.com/story/how-to-lock-down-facebook-privacy-settings/

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75 days after Maria, this is life in St. Croix

(CNN)The sound of rattling generators fill Tarik McMillan’s ears when he wakes up.

The noise is all around him, a mix between a car engine and a really big blender.
On St. Croix, an island where many places still don’t have power, the diesel generators in his neighborhood rumble through the night.
He walks to the kitchen and greets his grandpa, who’s boiling water on a propane stove to make coffee. Without power, the coffeemaker is a museum piece.
It’s been 75 days since Hurricane Maria hammered the US Virgin Islands, and although the buzz of daily life is returning, the storm’s ghost hovers over everything.
Power remains out for more than 60% of the territory. On St. Croix, the largest of the islands, only about a fourth of residents — known as Crucians — have electricity.Many homes still have no roofs. Cell networks are spotty.
This is the new normal for McMillan and the islands’ other residents as they negotiate their daily lives. There’s a gigantic line on their calendar — before Maria, and after. Almost nothing about the two is the same.

Morning coffee

Three days before Maria made landfall, McMillan, 25, went to stay with his grandfather. At the time, the 76-year-old was still recovering from surgery. McMillan didn’t want him facing the Category 5 hurricane alone.
Since the storm, life has slowed to a crawl. TV isn’t an option. So McMillan has found new ways to keep busy. He exercises. He reads.
He also got a dog — a pit bull mix — and takes it for walks around the block, noting the hurricane damage to his neighbors’ homes. Some of the houses he had never noticed, because before Maria hit he never walked around his neighborhood.
    “There isn’t much talking,” he says. They just wave.

    On the road

    By 11:30 a.m., it’s time for McMillan to head to work. He climbs into his Ford Escape and drives from Christiansted.
    Heavy traffic isn’t a problem like it was during the weeks right after Maria, when the islands’ governor imposed curfews to allow emergency crews and utility workers to do their jobs without interruptions.
    But he’s careful. Many stoplights still aren’t working. And some drivers play “chicken” with each other at intersections to see who’ll go first.
    All around, McMillan sees the way Maria has rearranged the landscape.
    “There’s not much that stands out right now,” he says. “Everything feels like it’s been this way for a very long time.”
    He passes gas stations with crumbled walls. A bushy field across from a graveyard is now a dumping ground for broken branches and battered tree trunks.
    Everywhere, bright, blue tarps double as temporary roofs.
    A silver sculpture, with a little-known story about the slave trade in the Caribbean, no longer stands upright on the grounds of one of the island’s two public high schools.
    Further to the west, the grounds that host the island’s annual agriculture fair remain in disrepair. The hangar-like buildings, usually filled with locally grown crops, no longer have roofs. The yellow, wooden booths where vendors sold dishes lie crumpled.
    “It looks like a giant had a temper tantrum,” McMillan says.
    The fair has been a St. Croix tradition for 46 years. There won’t be one next year.

    At work

    McMillan works part-time at the Boys & Girls Club as a youth counselor. In the days after the storm, he helped salvage materials and clean up debris from the club’s uninhabitable building in Christiansted.
    He’s lucky to have a job.
    So many don’t. More than 1,000 people in the US Virgin Island’s tourism industry, islanders’ bread and butter, remain out of work.
    At the Boys & Girls Club, McMillan helps teens with homework and tries to keep them out of trouble.
    Some of the kids don’t really want to talk about the storm.
    “Sometimes kids in general blur the line between resilience and denial,” he says. “People get so busy they forget to deal with the emotional stuff until it shows up as a different behavior later.”
    Since the storm, the number of students he mentored had dropped. Maria caused an exodus of islanders to the US mainland.

      Resident descibes Maria aftermath in St. Croix

    The students who remain rotate through school buildings that are still standing in four-hour blocks — meaning they no longer get a full day of school.
    At the Boys & Girls Club, they play basketball on a rebuilt court donated this year by former NBA player Rakeem Christmas, a St. Croix native.
    Maria snatched away chucks of the court’s tiled surface, leaving bone-jarring patches of concrete underneath.

      Man on St. Croix: I’d rather be back in Iraq

    Two weeks ago, McMillan started a temporary stint with FEMA as a crisis counselor. He’ll be tending to residents who sorely need it as they deal with the stresses of post-Maria life.
    “There are many complications associated with the aftermath of the storm in addition to not having power,” he says. “There are elderly people who were not able to apply for certain services. Some that are living in homes that are mold infested. Living alone. No generator.”
    There’s not much he can do about their circumstance, McMillan says. But he can offer them a platform to share their feelings.

    Nights at home

    On many evenings, McMillan gets home just as the sunlight starts to fade. He tries to avoid the pitch blackness that descends in many areas without powered street lamps.
    About 6 p.m., he and his grandfather flip on their generator, adding to the rumble throughout the neighborhood.
    When he cooks on the propane stove, it’s usually rice and beans. This is a step up from the bland cheese tortellini ready-to-eat meals he had in the chaotic first days after Maria. He’d spice them up with Adobo seasoning.
    McMillan never saves much of whatever he cooks. On most days, the refrigerator only cools food for about four hours and leftovers won’t last beyond lunchtime the next day.
    It’s not ideal, but there’s grace in the knowledge that McMillan and his granddad, unlike hundreds of others, don’t have to buy ice every day to cool their food and drinks.
    Sometimes McMillan will talk on the phone with his brother Biko, 21, who lives in Texas. Before Maria, the close-knit brothers could easily chat for an hour. Now they have to cut their talks short before they lose the signal or McMillan’s phone dies.
      Before he heads off to bed, he turns his generator off to save on gas and money.
      He drifts off to sleep with the sounds of diesel generators around him.

      A rare outing

      The other day, to boost his spirits, he went to the movies when the island’s only theater screened “The Foreigner.” He loves Jackie Chan.
      “For a brief moment, I forgot that we were in post-Maria,” McMillan says. “It felt like a normal night going to the movies.”
      But even in the confines of the theater, the reality of their daily struggles intruded.
      Before the movie was an ad for a local telecom. A pitchwoman said the company was working to restore services to the crippled islands.
      “She just shattered my dream; shattered my normal moment,” he says.
        For he knew that after the credits started rolling, he’d be returning to a home without electricity, no promise of reliable cell service and an island that he and thousands of other Crucians barely recognize.

        Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/12/03/us/us-virgin-islands-maria-recovery-trnd/index.html

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        Meghan Markle is royal family’s unconventional bride-to-be

        London (CNN)The wedding engagement of a feminist American actress and the fifth in line to the British throne is yet another sign the royal family is becoming a modern family.

        High-profile members of the British royal family marrying who they want — and not who they should — has been a gradual process.
        As Markle’s relationship with the prince blossomed, the British tabloids and social media commenters fixated on the fact that she’s not British, had been married before and comes from a biracial background. Her ethnicity, in particular, spurred tabloid coverage to the extent that her now-fiancé warned the media to stop harassing her last year.
          Markle shrugged it off during in her first joint interview with Prince Harry.
          “I’m really just proud of who I am and where I come from. And we have never put any focus on that,” she said.
          Their wedding will take place in spring 2018.
          In an article for Elle UK in 2015, Markle wrote about the difficulty of forging a career as a biracial actress. “I wasn’t black enough for the black roles and I wasn’t white enough for the white ones, leaving me somewhere in the middle as the ethnic chameleon who couldn’t book a job.”
          She spoke highly of the producers of “Suits” who “weren’t looking for someone mixed, nor someone white or black for that matter. They were simply looking for Rachel.”
          Markle said in her first interview with Prince Harry that she will be transitioning into a new role that will involve “causes that have been very important to me.”

          ‘Proud to be a feminist’

          Amongst those causes is her work for gender equality.
          “I’m proud to be a woman and a feminist,” said Markle in a speech at a United Nations conference on International Women’s Day 2015. She had just been named the UN Women’s Advocate for Political Participation and Leadership.
          Her commitment to gender equality began many years earlier, Markle explained. As an 11-year-old she had watched a soap commercial with the tagline “women all over America are fighting greasy pots and pans.”
          She described how two boys in her class said loudly in response that women belonged in the kitchen and how the younger Markle, “shocked and angry,” decided to take action. On the advice of her father, she wrote several letters, including one to the soap manufacturer and one to then-First Lady Hillary Clinton.
          In the end, she explained, the commercial was changed: The word “women” was removed and replaced with “people.”
          “It was at that moment that I realized the magnitude of my actions,” she said.
          She went on to call for more female political participation and representation. “Women need a seat at the table,” she said. And where that’s not possible, “then they need to create their own table.”

          Humanitarian efforts

          “With fame comes opportunity,” Markle wrote in a column for Elle UK in November 2016, “but it also includes responsibility — to advocate and share, to focus less on glass slippers and more on pushing through glass ceilings.”
          In 2016, she became a global ambassador for World Vision and traveled to Rwanda to see the impact of the charity’s clean water initiatives.
          Until earlier this year, Markle ran a lifestyle website, sharing her tips on food and fashion. But she posted pieces about self-empowerment too.
          “I knew I needed to be saying something of value,” she wrote last year, something about “subjects of higher value than selfies.”

          Markle: We’re ‘really happy and in love’

          Markle was married to film producer Trevor Engelson for two years before they divorced in 2013. It was three years later — in July 2016 — that she first met Prince Harry, introduced by mutual friends.
          The two dated in secret before the Prince put an end to the speculation in November last year. In a rare public statement, he confirmed their relationship and warned the press against harassing his girlfriend.
          It was almost another year before Markle spoke openly about their relationship. “We’re two people who are really happy and in love,” she told Vanity Fair in September.
          The last time a divorced American became engaged to a member of the British royal family, it triggered a crisis that ended with the abdication of King Edward VIII, her future husband. That was in 1936.

          Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/11/27/europe/meghan-markle-profile/index.html

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          17 Totally Epic Parenting Fails That WON the Internetfor Obvious Reasons

          Y’all, let’s be honest, when it comes to the parenting game, we’re all a little hopeless. Despite our best efforts, we’re sure to leave a kid at the grocery store or forget to pick them up at school on any given day of the week.

          And if you’ve never done it, just wait. Your time will come.

          These days the best way to make the most of even our most comical parenting fails is by sharing them on Facebook. Not because you need CPS on your doorstep, but because there’s something comforting in knowing that you’re not the only parent to have ever mixed up pajama day and picture day!

          Reddit

          Check out this compilation of the best #ParentingFails on the Internet.

          This little girl who has no idea:

          When you gotta go, you have got to GO!

          Wait, stop! #nevermind #toolate #pottytraining #parentingfail #dadfail #donttellmom

          A post shared by Phil Yeh (@philyeh) on

          This little girl who told her teacher that there’s “a lot of WEED” at her house…

          This parent who treated their daughter’s bloody nose with a “cotton stick”…

          Reddit

          “My Daughter’s Nose Started Bleeding In The Car And This Was The Only Thing I Had Handy…She Called It A ‘Cotton Stick’”

          This kid who’s clearly impressed with mom’s parenting:

          This little girl who turned her brother into a tasty treat…

          This dad who initiated #ParentingFails in the first hour…

          Wasted no time in committing the first of many parenting fails

          Kourtney Kardashian is ALL of us opening the car door…

          Imgur

          This kid who is now traumatized for the rest of his life…

          And thank goodness for washable paints!

          This mom who was kindly informed of the LEMUR on her daughter’s head at the zoo…

          Reddit

          This mom who got a little carried away with the Snot-sucker…

          When momma messes up with #nasalaspirator #oliverknox #babysales #morning #parentingfail #momfail #boogers

          A post shared by Michael Sales (@michaelsales26) on

          These kids who are squeaky clean thanks to mom checking her emails…

          “We’re Good Parents, I Swear…”

          Reddit

          This #ParentingFail that was accidentally caught on camera…

          My girlfriend randomly took a couple pictures of me at the grocery store. Only later did we notice…

          And of course, these travelers who take flying to new heights…literally!

          Cheers to the wonders of parenting my friends. It’s good to know we’re not alone!

          Read more: https://faithit.com/17-epic-parenting-fails-won-internet/

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          Husbands Viral Hunt for Wifes Nail Polish Color Is the Definition of #MarriageGoals

          Every woman’s got her own take on the definition of romance. For some, it’s a syrupy-sweet note left on the kitchen counter reminding her how much he cares. For others, it’s an after-work foot rub, or two dozen roses ‘just because.’

          But whatever your love language, it’s inarguable that this man right here takes Husband of the Year in the ‘acts of service’ category.


          Facebook

          While nobody knows who this anonymous backside belongs to, the Internet is officially head over HEELS for his adorably effortful attempt to find the perfect nail-polish shade for his lady.

          Brittney Johnson, an unsuspecting passerby perusing the cosmetic section herself, happened across his intense hunt for the EXACT olive hue she was looking for, and couldn’t help but pause for a quick eavesdrop on the priceless scene.

          “I’m sorry, sir, whoever you are.. for posting a pic of your backside for the world to see.. BUT I couldn’t help it,” she opens in her now-viral post.

          And we have to agree, she had good reason:

          “This man was on the phone with his wife, looking so hard for the EXACT Olive colored nail polish that she wanted. ‘I got this, I got this, I’ll be home in a bit.’

          Then he took a picture and sent it to her and she called to help him. He says ‘Ok, so I sent you the pic. Is that the right one? You wanna know the colors close to it? You just want all three colors??’

          THIS IS ALL IT TAKES.
          Effort. Showing someone that whatever is special to them means something to you because they want it, or need it, or just really like it.
          Putting yourself a little out of your comfort zone.
          Letting yourself feel foolish sometimes for the sake of making your girl (or man) happy.”

          Now those are some words of relationship GOLD right there. In the era of the ‘me-centric’ marriage, Brittney’s simple message of servanthood couldn’t be more relevant.

          She continues with a takeaway that totally turns the cliché flowers-cards-and-candy style of romance on its head, shedding a little perspective on what REAL lasting love looks like:

          “It’s still so cool to me.. the idea of romance.. not being flowers and cards and candy.. but being time, and proof that you’ve actually listened, and support of the things that set that person’s soul on fire. Marrying your best friend, being all for ONE person, that’s still pretty cool.

          Don’t settle for less than that y’all. Somebody, somewhere, will love you enough to go shopping alone for your favorite nail polish;)”

          Well said, Britt.

          …Now, I just gotta find me one of his kind who can land the perfect shade of “pretty princess” pink. 💞 😜

          Read more: https://faithit.com/husbands-viral-hunt-for-wifes-nail-polish-color-is-the-definition-of-marriagegoals/

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          Don’t Go Nuts On Thanksgiving Day. Here Are 15 Foods You Can Make Ahead.

          Thanksgiving is a holiday centered around spending time with family and friends and giving thanks for all we’ve been blessed with in life.

          But unfortunately for the designated chefs in the family, dinner prep can leave them with very little time to enjoy the perks of the day. Instead of huddling around the TV to watch the Macy’s parade or football games, you’re forced to slave over a stove to make sure everyone else is happily eating their body weight in pumpkin pie. But wouldn’t it be nice if you could prep most of your delicious goodies the day before, giving you more time to kick off your shoes and craft the perfect Black Friday game plan? If so, then this is a list you can truly be thankful for.

          Here are 15 Thanksgiving dishes that can be prepped ahead of time without losing any of their deliciousness.

          1. Make-Ahead Corn Bread Dressing

          2. Herb-Brined Turkey

          3. Freezer Macaroni And Cheese

          Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/make-ahead-thanksgiving/

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